It’s been a while since I’ve read Little Women, but it’s my favorite book from that time period, so I was eager to see what a modern retelling in movie form would look like.

The movie does a good job of capturing the essence of the story and transferring it to a contemporary setting. Many of the scenes and storylines are very much the same. The modern-day girls personify the original characters, and honestly, the actresses actually look like how I envisioned their characters. The writing really brought the characters to life.

The production design in Little Women was beautiful! Someone spent a lot of time trying to create a fairy tale looking world in a modern setting. I loved the sets and all the little details that went into them. I also liked the wardrobe choices for capturing the girls’ personalities.

With that said, I found it hard to follow the movie at times because of the time jumps. I can’t remember if the book did that or if they just did it to condense the story for the movie, but it would often jump from when the girls are little to when they’re teens to when they’re adults and, especially with Jo’s story, there were several times when I couldn’t keep up with when she was in college and when she was 29. But, fortunately, most of the time it really didn’t matter, and I could eventually catch on to when it was supposed to be.

The only other thing I didn’t feel worked was the parents. I love Lea Thompson, but she felt too young and beautiful to be Marmy. And the dad was pretty much nonexistent except in the few scenes where they talked to him. Otherwise, they never talked about him.

Watching the movie made me want to go back and reread the book so I could spend more time with the family. If you’ve got a copy of the book, I would recommend you do a quick read through of it then head to the theaters this weekend to see Little Women on the big screen.

Disclaimer: I received a free screener link and movie tickets for this movie in exchange for an honest review. Opinions expressed are my own.

About the Author Sharon Wilharm

Christian women’s speaker, Sharon Wilharm, is a ministry leader, podcast host, and female filmmaker whose stories have impacted audiences around the globe. An accomplished storyteller, Sharon draws the audience in with humor, engages them with stories, then ties everything together to bring to light spiritual truths. Her heart’s desire is to encourage women in their walk with the Lord, showing them how to find God’s will for their life through prayer and scripture. “God is the Master Storyteller,” says Sharon. “I love helping women see how God is always at work behind the scenes laying the foundation for the glorious future He has in store for us.” Sharon is a firm believer in the power of prayer and has many stories to share of God working in miraculous ways in her own life as well as those around her. She’s passionate about teaching women how to pray and loves engaging with women in personal prayer. Wherever she goes, she finds herself surrounded by women in need of prayer, and she considers it an honor to pray with women whether they’re friends, family, or complete strangers. Sharon has enjoyed a lifelong fascination with women of the Bible and loves applying the biblical stories to modern situations. She teaches a Women Through the Bible study at her church, applying the S.O.A.P. method of scripture study. She especially enjoys delving into lesser known women and discovering encouraging truths for women of today. She recently launched a new podcast where she works her way through the Bible sharing the stories of All God’s Women.

1 comment

  1. Thank you for sharing. I had no idea they did a modern remake of such a classic story. I remember reading the book when I was little as well, and watching the cartoon on HBO before heading out to school. Can’t wait to see this. 🙂

    Like

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